Paul Bishop: Kirkintilloch and the Flax and Linen Industries: March 2021

Prof Paul Bishop, a member of the Society, is a geographer and retired academic from the University of Glasgow with interests in local  history and industrial archaeology. In this talk, he presents an overview of the linen industry in Kirkintilloch and district, including the various stages from the harvesting of flax through to the weaving of linen.


The video can be viewed directly by clicking on the above image of the first slide in Paul's presentation, or by going to the Society's YouTube channel which can be accessed by clicking here.

Members' Night: February 2021

The recorded contributions for this session's virtual Members' Night - "The place in Scotland I most want to return to post-Covid" - are now available for viewing. As on previous Members' Nights, there is a variety of interpretations of the theme and, in addition this year, there is a new participant who has not previously spoken to the Society.

The video can be viewed directly by clicking on the above image of the title slide, or by going to the Society's YouTube channel which can be accessed by clicking here.

Jeff Hopewell: The Stained Glass of Douglas Hamilton and the Stephen Adam Stained Glass Studio: February 2021

The fifth of the virtual'meetings in the 2020-21 session of the Antiquaries is a talk by Canon Jeff Hopewell entitled 'The Stained Glass of Douglas Hamilton and the Stephen Adam Stained Glass Studio'. In this video, Jeff describes Hamilton’s early life and training with Alf Webster and the Stephen Adam Studio in Glasgow, and his ten years at Guthrie & Wells before he started his own business in 1938, which he ran until his death in 1959. This subject is also of local interest as windows made by the Stephen Adam Studio and Douglas Hamilton can be found in Kirkintilloch's St Mary's and St David’s Memorial Park parish churches.
 
Jeff is a retired Church of England priest based in Leicestershire who has long been interested in church buildings and furnishings, with a particular bent towards stained glass. His first book on this subject, ‘Orchestrations of Colour’, covering the life and work of Douglas Hamilton, was published last year, and he is currently researching the work of the Victorian firm of the Horwood Brothers, Frome. He also has a knowledge of Japanese woodblock prints and modestly claims to be a world expert on ganjifa, the traditional hand-painted playing cards of India.


The talk can be viewed directly by clicking on the above image of the front cover of Jeff's book on Douglas Hamilton, or by going to the Society's YouTube channel which can be accessed by clicking here.

The Society's January 2021 Newsletter

The January 2021 edition of the Society's newsletter has recently been created and edited by committee member Valerie McClure. It includes the immediate plans of the Antiquaries, a review of last year and items of general interest for members. It can be viewed or downloaded by clicking on the image of the first page below.


The newsletter has already been circulated to those members of the Society who provided their email addresses following the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation 2018. The list of active email addresses will be updated using the information supplied on the membership renewal slips for the 2021-22 session.

Nina Baker: Scotswomen Working in Engineering: January 2021

The fourth of the 'virtual' meetings in the 2020-21 session of the Antiquaries is a talk by Dr Nina Baker entitled 'Scotswomen Working in Engineering'. In this presentation, she shares some of the terrific stories about amazing women, from her years of research into these hidden histories, focussing on women who were engineering graduates of the Scottish universities or who worked in Scotland. 

Nina has had a varied career - she became a merchant navy deck officer on leaving school and then, in her 30s, obtained an engineering design degree from the University of Warwick and later a PhD in concrete durability from the University of Liverpool. She has lived with her family in Glasgow since 1989, working variously as a materials lecturer in further education and as a research administrator and, until 2017, as an elected city councillor. Now retired, her interest in promoting STEM careers for girls has led her to become an independent researcher, mainly specialising in the history of women in engineering. It is hoped that she will be able to give a full talk on this subject matter whenever the Society reverts to conventional meetings.


The presentation lasts for less than half an hour and can be viewed directly by clicking on the above image of Dorothee Pullinger, the automobile engineer, or by going to the Society's YouTube channel which can be accessed by clicking here.